Visiting Hatshepsut Temple: A complete guide

Oct 11, 2019 | Africa, Egypt, Global travel

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(Last updated on: 02/04/2020)

If you’re travelling to Egypt, you likely have a list as long as your arm of the sites you want to see. Whether Hatshepsut Temple is already on that list or not, here’s a complete guide to visiting.

What is Hatshepsut Temple

Located beneath the cliffs at Deir el-Bahari on the west bank of the Nile – close to modern day Luxor – the temple serves as just one of many incredible sites to see in the area.

Its full name is The Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, and it is also know as Djeser-Djeseru which translates roughly as Holy of Holies. It was built for 18th Dynasty pharaoh Hatshepsut. She was only the second-ever female pharaoh, history tells us.

Construction of the Hatshepsut Temple was overseen by the royal architect Senenmut. There are layered terraces, porto-Doric columns and square piers as well as ramps that would once have been surrounded by gardens filled with plants. With the temple there is a sun court, chapel, sanctuary and more.

Visiting the temple

To get to Hatshepsut Temple there are various routes. You can take a half-hour walk from the Valley of the Kings over the mountain pass – there is a trail, and it isn’t as busy as other ways of getting to the temple. Of course, this involves getting to the Valley of the Kings. You can get here easily on foot or by taxi. If you are coming from Luxor on the other side of the Nile take the ferry.

DON’T FORGET! You can also visit the temple, and all of the other popular sites in the area, on a Nile Cruise.

It is best to visit Hatshepsut Temple with a guide. There are some fascinating stories about the temple as well as the pharaoh herself, and a guide will be able to tell you everything you want to know.

Valley of the Queens
Exploring Hatshepsut Temple

There is an entrance fee to visit Hatshepsut Temple. You may be on a tour that includes entry to the temple area, but if not the costs are as follows…

Hatshepsut Temple entrance fees

  • Non-Egyptian tourist: 80 EGP
  • Non-Egyptian student (with relevant ID): 40 EGP
  • Egyptian national: 10 EGP
  • Egyptian student (with relevant ID): 5 EGP

As mentioned, tours are available. These tend to be tours of the west bank as a whole, that incorporate Hatshepsut Temple as part of the day. These leave from the likes of Aswan and Hurghada. There are also different and slightly unique tours available, such as a sunrise hot air balloon ride over the temple and other sites.

What else can I see nearby?

Near to Hatshepsut Temple there are plenty of other sites to see. If you are interested in Ancient Egyptian culture and history you will likely already have an idea of the places you want to visit – but here are the most popular sites near to the temple itself…

  • The Valley of the Kings – home to over 60 tombs, the valley was the final resting place for many kings during the 18th, 19th and 20th dynasties.
  • The Temple of Karnak – one of the biggest temple complexes with plenty to see. Again it is advised that you visit with a guide to get the most out of your trip.
  • Ramesseum – otherwise known as the Mortuary Temple of Ramses II, it was built on the site of Seti I’s ruined temple. It also inspired a Percy Bysshe Shelly verse, linked to its nickname of the tomb of Ozymandia.
  • The Howard Carter House – home of the archaeologist who discovered the tomb of King Tut himself. The house still has his dark room as well as plenty of his possessions for visitors to see.

Where to stay when visiting the Hatshepsut Temple

In order to be within easy reach of the temple and other nearby sites, it is best to stay in Luxor. This modern area lies on the site of the ancient city of Thebes. Luxor has plenty of accommodation to offer as well as museums, bars, restaurants, shops and more. Here are some options…

At just 1 mile from the Hatshepsut Temple, Nour El Gourna is perfectly located. The authentic-looking hotel offers single, twin, double and triple rooms for an affordable price. There is free parking available as well as an airport shuttle service; the rooms are non-smoking, and pets are allowed for any more-local tourists. Many of the west bank sites are within walking distance.

Memnon Hotel, located in Luxor, offers single and double rooms with free WiFi and free on-site private parking. No-smoking rooms, a 24-h front desk, bike rental service and more are available at this hotel which is approximately 1.3 miles from Hatshepsut Temple.

If you’re travelling with a larger group and are looking for a villa, Shahhat House sleeps six. With stunning views and huge outdoor seating area to take it all in, this is perfect for a short or long stay. There are three bedrooms – two with double beds and one with two singles – as well as a kitchen, free WiFi and free parking.

For more accommodation options, try Luxor- which isn’t far away. Type in your travel dates below to see what’s available.

Booking.com

Places to eat and drink in the area

Although there isn’t a lot in the immediate vicinity, there are some eateries and bars that aren’t too far from the Hatshepsut Temple. Here are some visitor favourites…

  • Wenkie’s – a German coffee and ice cream parlour. They offer a wide variety of sorbet and ice cream flavours as well as hot drinks, waffles and more.
  • Al-Sahaby Lane Restaurant – this traditional Middle Eastern restaurant comes highly recommended, offering vegetarian, vegan, halal and gluten free options.
  • Pizza Roma-it – if you’re looking for Italian food, their pizza is raved about by many. You can watch them being prepared, too.
  • Hatshepsut Restaurant – this is a rooftop bar with views of the west bank, and the opportunity to watch some belly dancing on certain evenings.
  • The King’s Head – if you’re visiting from England and want a bit of home, head here. It’s not tacky, but it is warm and welcoming if you want a nice drink away from the hustle and bustle of the city and the tourist traps.

There you have it – a guide to visiting the Hatshepsut Temple and the surrounding area. Enjoy your trip.

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Hi, am Dr Hayley Stainton

I’ve been travelling, studying and teaching travel and tourism since I was 16. Through Tourism Teacher I share my knowledge on the principles and practice of travel and tourism management from both an academic and practical perspective.

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